YCCS Youth Share Findings with Outside Audiences

Overview

Youth Share Findings with Outside Audiences

Sharing what you’ve learned is fundamental to YCCS, yet the audiences and uses of data and findings are often invisible to participants. Involving youth directly in sharing findings with outside audiences is one way to (1) further motivate, (2) help youth review and reflect on what youth are learning, and (3) diversify the products, processes and people involved in YCCS. Read more about this key practice, why we think it is important to learning in YCCS, and the different forms it can take – from scientific posters, to blogs, to conversations with community members.

YOUTH SHARE FINDINGS WITH OUTSIDE AUDIENCES

Sharing what you’ve learned is fundamental to YCCS, yet the audiences and uses of data and findings are often invisible to participants. Involving youth directly in sharing findings with outside audiences is one way to (1) further motivate, (2) help youth review and reflect on what youth are learning, and (3) diversify the products, processes and people involved in YCCS. Read more about this key practice, why we think it is important to learning in YCCS, and the different forms it can take – from scientific posters, to blogs, to conversations with community members.

TIPS FOR IMPLEMENTING

Determine the appropriate audience based on your goals.

The quadrants in the figure above provide one example of how to think about different audiences. Not all require extensive work on the part of educators. Short conversations with people passing by a research site or posting work online can position students as experts. In addition, scientists and members of the public have different norms for verbal and written communication. The kind of audience you choose has implications for the kind of language and norms young people learn about.

Emphasize audience so that it builds buy-in but doesn’t overwhelm the project focus.

A real audience can be rewarding but also cause anxiety. Make sure to support young people so they feel pride in their accomplishments without unnecessary stress.

Prepare youth with audience-appropriate scaffolds.

It is important to provide scaffolding throughout a project so young people are ready to present their findings. Example scaffolds include: practicing public speaking through “lightning talks” or writing practice blogs in the appropriate genre.

Plan for collaboration between educators and community members.

Try to collaborate with CCS project staff, other scientists, community members or local city government if those are appropriate audiences. Collaboration takes time so start conversations early.

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