Research

Research Base

Overview
Group of teachers engaging in discussion
  • Instruction in specific reading strategies can increase content learning across discipline areas (Bereiter & Bird, 1985; Moore & Scevack, 1997)
  • Repeated exposure to writing activities can lead to both greater content knowledge and improved writing ability (Bean & Steenwyk, 1984; Brown & Day, 1983)
  • Taking the time to allow students to verbally articulate their understanding of the content helps them understand the material (Thier & Daviss, 2002; Hill & Flynn, 2006)
  • Effective science instruction includes opportunities for students to engage in inquiry, and to engage in scientific discussions to construct explanations (Gallas, 1995; Lemke, 1990; Rosebery, Warren & Conant, 1992; Wilkinson & Silliman, 2000)
Post

Phenomena-Questions-Models

Presented at NSTA National Conference 2017

3-dimensional learning is supported by lessons that employ phenomena, questions, and models. What is meant by these terms, what characteristics make them useful for instruction? Here you will find a pdf version of the presentation that investigates these critical features of science learning.

For more information on the presentation contact Arthur Beauchamp (acbeauchamp@ucdavis.edu) or Cindy Passmore (cpassmore@ucdavis.edu).

General information

Research Conducted: CPEC Building Academic Literacy through Science

Theoretical Basis:

Effective science instruction includes opportunities for students to engage in inquiry, and to engage in scientific discussions to construct explanations (Gallas, 1995; Lemke, 1990; Rosebery, Warren & Conant, 1992; Wilkinson & Silliman, 2000). Participating in scientific discourse, however, requires specific discourse skills. Students need to know vocabulary as more than definitions; they need to understand the scientific concepts embedded in the words.

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