CCS Salmon in the Classroom

Salmon in the Classroom

As scientists investigate the cause of a thiamine deficiency in Pacific salmon, high school classrooms in and around Sacramento County are given the unique opportunity to contribute data to this ongoing research.

Overview

Thiamine Deficiency Complex (TDC) was first documented in California’s salmon in 2020, when hatchery staff noticed offspring swimming in circles and dying at elevated rates. They traced the condition to a deficiency of thiamine, or vitamin B1, passed on from the returning adults to their offspring. Impacts to naturally spawning populations remain the greatest unknown and could be an unrecognized factor affecting harvest opportunities and impede salmon recovery.

The Aquarium in the Classroom program through the California Department of Fish and Wildlife provides students grades K-12 with salmon eggs to hatch and grow in their classrooms. The team at the Center for Community and Citizen Science, in collaboration with researchers at the UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Department of Fish and Wildlife are developing an Observation Protocol as part of the Aquariums In the Classroom Program to help gather observation data of salmon during these critical stages of the salmon life cycle.

As a part of our work, the data collected through the Aquarium in the Classroom Program will be sent to support the efforts of the broad coalition of scientists working on figuring out the TDC puzzle. The student data contributions to this project are not only utilizing a citizen science approach to gathering important data, but also developing further research protocols. Find out more about this project in our posts (more coming soon!) below.

Blog entry

An Update from Salmon in the Classroom

As scientists investigate the cause of  thiamine deficiency in California’s Central Valley salmon, high school classrooms in California’s Central Valley were given the unique opportunity to contribute data to this ongoing research.

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